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Geneva Lake Environmental Agency

The Geneva Lake Environmental Agency is determined to maintain Geneva Lake's resources by protecting, preserving and enhancing a desirable lake and watershed quality, through monitoring, protection and education. 

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2023 Annual Geneva Lake Ice-On Contest 

Guess the date Geneva Lake freezes over!

The GLEA’s annual Ice-On Contest is in full swing! We invite kids, kindergarten through 8th grade, to guess the date that Geneva Lake will freeze over. Our goal is to encourage the students to view how weather affects the lake and for them to develop an understanding relationship with the lake. We have included a little information for the children to consider regarding conditions that affect the lake freezing. Submit your entry by December 22, 2023. Prizes will be awarded. We look forward to reading your entries!

GLEA has officially ended its annual summer beach testing season with the closure of all public beaches on Labor Day. Please check back next year on Memorial Day when beaches open for the summer!

2023 SUMMER PUBLIC BEACH TESTING 

2023 SUMMER REPORTS

Nearshore Fisheries Survey

GLEA worked with retired DNR staff on conducting a Nearshore Fisheries Survey for the lake. This survey has been done 4 times on Geneva Lake, beginning in 1978 and the most recent one conducted in 2018.  The report not only describes current fish populations, but also compares them to previous surveys as well. 

A total of 18 sites were sampled to understand the nearshore fish population. Gar, darter species, bass, panfish (bluegill, sunfish, perch, rock bass), bullheads, and killifish, where among just some of the species found.  Read the full report below!

Aquatic Plant PI Survey

GLEA worked with Southeastern Wisconsin Regional Planning Commission on our Annual Aquatic Plant PI Survey.

 

Through sampling a grid of points on the lake, we can document the overall plant diversity as well as locations of certain species. This survey also helps us monitor where starry stonewort is and how it spreads year to year. Look out for that report later this year!

Boat Count

GLEA conducted the annual boat count early August to assess boats docked and moored on Geneva Lake. Motorized boats, sailboats, personal watercraft, and non-motorized vessels, are all included. The GLEA spends a day on the water counting boats on the shore and collecting numbers from storage facilities and marinas. The "Data" tab has more information on comparative counts for past years. 

Follow the link below to read the 2023 Boat Count assessment!

 

Check out new boat cleaning stations at Williams Bay, Lake Geneva, and Fontana launches!

Brought to you by the Geneva Lake Environmental Agency, Villages of Williams Bay and Fontana, the City of Lake Geneva, and WI DNR grant.

CD3 Roadside
Waterless Cleaning System

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We encourage you to clean your boat when entering and exiting Geneva Lake to help us stop the spread of aquatic invasive species

A CLEAN BOAT MEANS CLEAN WATERS

Thank you to Ms. Garcia & Katrina, Elizabeth, Julia, and Chris for finding this excellent resource and sharing the importance of lake ecology!

STARRY STONEWORT UPDATE July 27, 2022.

 

We spent time at the starry stonewort colony site scuba diving to monitor populations. Starry stonewort is an invasive plant that was first seen in Geneva Lake in 2018. These plants are solely male and spread by releasing bulbils, that act as seeds, growing wherever they land. Movement such as hand-pulling is believed to actually stir up these seed-like bulbils and cause more damage by promoting spreading. Through routine dive checks on known population sites we are able to see how these plants are growing. While starry stonewort hasn't gone away, we haven't seen too much growth and believe our native species have been doing a good job at keeping this invasive plant at bay. 

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Diving with Linn Fire Department

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Underwater photos of aquatic plants at a starry stonewort colony site 

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SWIMMERS ITCH

How to stay safe this summer

Swimmer's itch is caused by flatworm larvae that can unintentionally latch onto human skin when looking for a waterfowl host and cause irritation or itchiness. They like warm water at around 72°F. When your skin dries, the larvae will burrow into the skin and eventually die, but this typically results in some uncomfortable itchiness.

WAYS TO TREAT
Don't scratch! Use an antihistamine lotion. Don't panic, swimmers itch is rarely serious and will pass in a couple days

CONTACT US

Tel. 262-245-4532

PO Box 914

350 Constance Blvd. 
Williams Bay, WI 53191

Our Office:

George Williams College Campus, Lowrey Building

350 Constance Blvd., Williams Bay, WI 53191

Monday - Friday: 8:30 AM - 5 PM

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